It's a tough call but you decide to trust your girls and graduate the oldest ones. They are ready and so are you. You appoint them as teachers in various cities.

Your schools are doing so well they catch the attention of Rabbi Meyer Shapiro, a well-respected rabbi (and later the head of the Yeshiva in Lublin), visits your school, which has 280 students. It's kind of a big deal. He's so impressed that he suggests that you open a teacher's seminary.

 
A group of Bais Yaakov Teachers, Notice How young these women are (Photo Taken from Carry Me In Your Heart, the Life And Legacy of Sarah Schenirer)

A group of Bais Yaakov Teachers, Notice How young these women are
(Photo Taken from Carry Me In Your Heart, the Life And Legacy of Sarah Schenirer)

Option 1

How did this happen? You just started with twenty-five students in a tailor shop. You are so overwhelmed by everything that is going on that your brain fries a little. You tell Rabbi Shapiro and the Agudah that you'll stick with what you have.

Option 2

Sure, why not? And since you're doing innovative stuff you float the idea of teaching the girls in this new seminary Talmud. [1] After all, this new seminary is the first of its kind, why not make it as similar to a Yeshiva as possible.

[1] While the Orthodox and Chassidish communities were starting to bend on teaching girls Torah, in the mid 1900’s they weren’t anywhere near ready to start teaching girls Talmud. That stayed taboo until the 1970’s when Rav Joseph B. Soloveitchik started teaching Talmud to women at Yeshiva University. There are still people today who think women should not be learning Talmud.

Option 3

Bring it on! With new facilities, you’ll be able to accept more students and teach even more girls Torah. Now you’ll really be able to properly train your girls to carry out your mission in other cities.